February Reading Romp

In February I didn’t get as much reading done as I really wanted to. Part of it was due to the fact that I spent a little more time studying, and I got quite a bit of writing done. Another factor was work picking up, so that naturally left me with less time to read.

Normally if that’s the case I just compensate by sleeping less. However I’ve figured out that if I don’t get enough sleep, the 4:30am wake up call is rough. Really rough. And I look like hell. I don’t like looking like hell.

Enough of my bloviating. Here are the books I got through this February.

Essentialism – The Disciplined Pursuit Of Less.

I found this book to be incredibly insightful. Most of the info is something you may already know, but delivered and packaged in a way that makes it seem new. Essentialism is all about removing the unnecessary from your life. Not ridiculous things like absurd throw pillows in your house, but the throw pillows of your life. Unnecessary meetings that do no good, learning how to tell people no, distractions from your cell phone.

McKeown goes on to describe how Essentialists actually have far more freedom in their lives by taking on less. Which sounds counterintuitive, but he makes an excellent case. After reading the book I’ll definitely be attempting to practice the disciplined pursuit of less.

One of my favorite themes is quite moving a millimeter in a million different directions, and focus all your efforts in one direction. That one is especially relevant for me at this very moment.

Equal parts entertaining stories, and life lessons, this book was one that I could easily come back to and read again. I’d also pick up new lessons, for sure. You can snag it here.

I Will Teach You To Be Rich.

I’m honestly not sure what took me so long to get around to this book, because I’ve read Ramit Sethi’s blog for quite awhile. Regardless, I thoroughly loved this book. It’s all on personal finance, but the thing that makes it great is just how breezy and funny it is, while making you feel like a personal finance genius.

Another thing I loved about the book is how much Ramit talks down on ridiculous budgeting and finance tips like “quit buying $5 lattes” or “save more, spend less” which all sound good, but in reality don’t teach anyone anything. He actually spends a decent amount of the book relating these things to useless weight loss tips like “eat less, move more” in the diet world.

A huge portion of the book is optimizing finances through credit cards, investing, savings, and then buying what you love. I highly recommend it to anyone and everyone. At the very least go get smarter by reading Ramit’s blog.

You can snag his book here. It’s a fantastic one, and highly entertaining. Overall I came away feeling much smarter about money, and laughing my ass off.

Precision Nutrition

This isn’t a pleasure book, nor a book that I read in February alone. It’s just a certification that I completed this month, and finished reading the book this month. Precision Nutrition is the gold standard as far as nutrition certifications go,  and is used by USA Track and Field, The San Antonio Spurs, and other organizations. In other words, Precision Nutrition don’t play games.

This took up a significant amount of time, and I struggled with making sure I set aside enough time to give this attention it deserved.

Get Change.

All I can really say about this book is that it’s a trip. I had heard of the guys from Barbell Shrugged podcast before, but hadn’t ever listened. I know they’ve made some pretty big strides in the industry though, and this was a fantastic read from one of the head honchos.

Chris Moore is equal parts meat head, lifting enthusiast, music lover, and one hell of a writer. I thoroughly enjoyed the style of writing in this book, and it’s blunt yet eloquent style.

A couple of my favorite quotes:

When we are willing to change with everything else, we are alright. When we resist, we are fucked.

Send a quick message to a close friend. Tell them you were just thinking of them and hope that they’re doing great. Tell them you miss them. You can see that this is a nice thing to do. It feels good, like an opiate. You know that friend will carry on with a smile, spreading a groovy little vibe to the next hundred or so people they contact. That’s powerful.

Snag the book here. You won’t be disappointed. I’ll absolutely come back to this book at some point to gain some new insight, and to remind myself exactly why I’m doing what I’m doing.